Category Archives: Youtube

Yellow Sally Dry Fly

I’ve been busy tying a few dry flies for my small creek fly box and these Yellow Sally flies are great for covering the Isoperla that hatch late April – August. The Sallies are a smaller species of stoneflies that hatch along with mayfly species and can be overlooked. I tie this using sulfur, pale morning dun, pale evening dun and other shades of yellow dubbing.

Yellow Sally Dry Fly Recipe

Hook: Firehole 419 #12-18
Butt: Red 8/0 (70d)
Thread: Olive 8/0 (70d)
Body: Pale Morning Dun Dry Dubbing
Wing: Light deer hair
Hackle: Light ginger saddle hackle

Yellow Sally Dry Fly
Yellow Sally Dry Fly

The Pass Lake Special

The Pass Lake Special is an old soul with fuzzy origins. Claim for its genesis comes from Labrador, Washington and the most popular from Wisconsin. There are many lakes scattered around the US and Canada which bear the moniker Pass Lake, but the commonly assumed namesake is the Pass Lake located near Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. The fly’s origins date back to the 1930’s. As is often the case with fly patterns, its roots are hard to pin down. This version of the origin story states that Reverend E. Stubenvoll (Clintonville, WI) had tied the fly for this Ontario lake in order to pursue the lakes large brook trout.

Okay, with that out of the way, the fly is long-lived and as many flies in this category, many variations of the pattern are spawned over the years as the fly passes from angler to angler. Tails can be either mallard or golden pheasant tippet. Bodies are either black chenille or peacock herl. The wing can tie tied in an assortment of colors and the head can be changed with thread choice or black or red. Basically, the only thing that stays static is the hackle.

Pass Lake Special Fly Recipe

Hook: Mustad S82-3906B #08-16 or 2xl nymph
Thread: Black 8/0 (70d)
Body: Black chenille
Collar: Coachman brown hen hackle
Wing: Calf tail

The Pass Lake Special Fly Pattern
The Pass Lake Special

Rubber Legged Evil Weevil

This is a variation of Jeremy Davis’ Evil Weevil, a fly which has been quite productive in the streams with trout of all stripes. This version of the weevil uses silicone legs taken from a bass skirt. You can find these in an infinite variety of colors and patterns to suit your needs. To finish the fly, a dab of UV resin will set the wingcase and secure the thread.

Rubber Legged Evil Weevil Trout Fly Pattern Recipe

Hook: Firehole 315 #10-18 or another curved scud hook
Bead: Tungsten gold/copper
Thread: Olive 8/0 (70d)
Tail: Pheasant tail
Rib: Gold wire (BR)
Shellback / Wingcase: Olive scud back
Body: Olive dubbing
Thorax: Dark olive dubbing
Legs: Rubber or silicone olive barred
U.V resin optional

Rubber Legged Evil Weevil Fly Pattern Recipe
Rubber Legged Evil Weevil Fly Pattern Recipe

Tungsten Crystal Midge Trout Fly

The Tungsten Crystal Midge is an extension of the popular Zebra Midge. I fish this pattern in sizes 16 down to 22 and use a little Solarez Bonedry to coat the body of the fly for durability. The Tungsten Crystal Midge is a great choice for pressured water either river or still water. Use a bead head and thread that is sized to the hook you are using. One the smallest flies I use 70d Ultrathread because it lays flat. I prefer the UNI-French oval tinsel, but a silver wire works great as well.

Tungsten Crystal Midge Trout Fly Pattern Recipe

Hook: Mustad C49s #16-22
Bead: Silver Tungsten sized to bead
Thread: Black UTC 6/0 (140d)
Rib: XS UNI-French Oval Tinsel
Wing: Pearl crystal flash
Thorax: Black Ice Dubbing

Shwa Creek Caddis

The Shwa Creek Caddis is a pattern I’ve adapted over the past couple seasons starting with a simple caddis Pupa pattern. I’ve added a lightly contrasting rib of UNI-Yarn to dull down the bright chartreuse and added ostrich herl (or dyed black peacock) over the bronze olive Diamond Dubbing I had been using. The ostrich adds a bit of movement to the fly. If you would like me to tie a few for you, you can get in touch through the About Us page.

Shwa Creek Caddis fly pattern recipe

Hook: Mustad C49s #10-18
Bead: Black brass or tungsten
Thread: Dark olive 6/0 (140d)
Rib: UNI-Yarn Insect Green
Body: Fl. Chartreuse Laser Dubbing
Thorax: Black ostrich herl
Thorax: Bronze olive Diamond Dubbing

Silkworm Chironomid

I developed the Silkworm Chironomid around 2005 for targeting trout in Alberta’s pothole lakes like Star Lake, Muir Lake, and Phyllis Lake. The body of the chironomid is made from UNI-Glo, a glow in the dark tinsel. While it does glow, this effect fades after a minute or so in the dark, but the light color helps fish key in on a quick snack.

It’s been a successful pattern for trout, perch, sunfish, and crappie. It has also taken a couple smallmouth bass. I’ve sold this fly to clients mostly in the western states and provinces, but I’ve done well using it in Ontario waters as well. I normally use brass beads, but you could use either glass or tungsten to adjust their sink rate.

You can fish this fly on a long leader using a very slow retrieve, or fish it under a strike indicator and let the wind move the fly.

Silkworm Chironomid Fly pattern Recipe

Hook: Mustad C49s #10-18
Bead: White brass or tungsten
Thread: Blue 6/0 (140d)
Rib: Fine copper wire
Body: UNI-Glo
Thorax: 1-2 peacock herls

Episode 12 – Veverka’s Mantis Shrimp Saltwater Fly

Episode 12 – The infamous Bob Veverka came up with the design of his Mantis Shrimp saltwater fly pattern in response to recognizing missing elements that weren’t filled by standard bonefish patterns that were on the market. With educated bonefish becoming ever increasingly picky having had seen quite a number of the standard flies, Bob set to work on a better bonefish fly.

The fly design uses a series of separated legs so that they can each be moved independently rather than clumped into one section. The rabbit fur carapace also gives the fly a lot of natural looking movement and can be tied in a contrasting color than the tail, or tied to mimic an egg sac.

There have been some who have issues with the fly riding point down when tied with bead chain eyes. This seems to remedy itself when heavier brass or lead eyes are used. That being said, it is a highly effective saltwater fly and one I consider essential to any angler’s saltwater fly box.

DIY laser Dub – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=paQSyTxRyTI

Veverka Mantis Shrimp Saltwater Fly Recipe

Hook: Saltwater #2-6
Thread: Tan 6/0
Eyes: 3.2mm black bead chain
Tail: Tan fox or craft fur
Mouth: Ginger or tan rabbit
Legs: Silicone orange and brown
Body: Tan Laser Dub

Hope to see you on the channel.

Episode 1 Piscator Flies Fly Tying Series

Episode 1 – Woolly Bugger is now live on our Youtube channel. You can visit our updated page at youtube.com/c/PiscatorFlies. While you are there, we would really appreciate you subscribing for new updates.

We do not have a set upload schedule as of yet, but the more tyers we have watching, the more motivated we will be to post a few patterns. We would love to have your suggestions on patterns or types of flies that you would like to see on the channel. In addition to the specific patterns, we will also be sharing a few of our favourite fly tying tips and bench hacks to make tying life a little simpler.

Hope to see you on the channel.